April Fashion Terms to Know

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It’s April and time for another installment of Fashion Terms to know.  I try to give definitions to common used and unique fashion items for your enjoyment.  You may think you know the definition but sometimes you may be surprised.  Enjoy!

Loom: A machine on which cloth is woven not knitted.  Yarns are raised and lowered to produce the desired weave.

Lycra: Trademarked by the DuPont company.  A filament spandex fiber.  Fabric is not 100% Lycra, used for stretch and recovery.

Macaroni: Not the pasta!  Pronounce Mack-a-roo-knee. Used to describe a fashionable man (the term used before Metrosexual) in the time of King George the third.  Refers to members of the Macaroni club formed in England.  The style of dress came later. Trademarks include tight clothing, colorful clothing, large boutonniere, enormous buckles and decorative buttons with a tricorn hat.  Remember the nursery rhyme “Yankee Doodle Dandy?”  A dandy is also another name for a Macaroni.  So when you get to the line “stuffed a feather in his hat and called him Macaroni.”  It’s not the pasta pronunciation but the clothing one!

Macrame: Two, three, four or more strands of cord, string or yarn knotted in groups to form patterns.  Popular in 1970’s to make clothing, and other accessories.

Made-To-Measure: Dress or suit made according to an individual’s measurement often with not fittings.

Magenta: Purplish-red color, first chemical dye to be used for dress fabrics.  Named after a town in Italy where it was developed.

Moire: A fabric finish that achieves a wave-like watered effect by heated rollers. A stiff fabric made with rayon, silk, acetate.  Used in evening fabrics.

Moleskin: A cotton fabric known for being durable and suede like in touch.  Made with a satin weave.

Pompadour Bag:  A drawstring bag in a round or oval shape that was common in the 1880’s and was made of velvet, satin or another fine fabric with floral embroidery and use of gold and silver thread.

Mackintosh Raincoat: Most commonly plastic yellow, a style of waterproof coat combined with a cape worn by Fire or police.  British slang also used for all raincoats.

Slicker: Also another type of raincoat commonly in a yellow hue.  It is made of oilskin or another rubber fabric and fastened with clips in the front.  First used by sailors and today commonly used in children’s coats.

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